JMHS Blog

Myths About Earning Your High School Diploma Online

Written by Allison Brenner on Wednesday, 13 August 2014. Posted in Helpful Tips

Myths About Earning Your High School Diploma Online

Earning that high school diploma is a vital stepping stone if you aspire to get into your dream college or start that great career. Even so, attending a traditional brick and mortar school may not be the best choice for everyone – for a variety of reasons. Fortunately, there are alternatives.

The concept of earning your high school diploma online is relatively new, so naturally confusions and misconceptions exist about taking high school courses over the Internet. How do you know if online education is right for you? Here are some myth-busters to help you make the right decision.

1. I won’t be able to make friends attending high school online

Although you won’t see your friends every day like you would in a traditional high school, earning your high school diploma online doesn’t mean you won’t make friends. Some schools, like James Madison High School, have an active online community that enables students to interact with each other to form study groups, share interests and connect on a daily basis.

2. Colleges and jobs won’t accept online high school diplomas

Just like with a brick and mortar school, you’ll want to be sure the online high school you choose is accredited. Simply put, accreditation means your diploma will be seen as legitimate by future employers and colleges. As long as you do your research and enroll in an accredited school, you should have no problem landing admission in a great college or better job. In particular, look for accreditation by accrediting agencies that are recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, such as the Southern Association of College and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI)

3. Online high school is expensive

Online high schools vary in cost, just as traditional high schools do, but in some cases, online high schools may cost less than a brick and mortar private school. Also, because online high schools don’t require funding for sports teams, booster clubs or grounds that need maintenance, the cost of traditional high school balances out with that of an online school.

4. Students in online high schools do less work than in traditional high school

Nothing could be further from the truth! The Common Core Curriculum details a set of mathematics and language arts standards that 45 states, including the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands, have adopted. This ensures that these high schools, traditional and online, are on the same page as far as academic quality. While students earning their high school diploma online have the option to study when and where they find it convenient, rather than being tied to a classroom and concurrent assignment deadlines, the lessons learned online are just as challenging as those found in a brick and mortar school.

5. Online high school is just for teenagers

Anyone who wishes to earn his or her high school diploma may do so online. There is no age restriction or age discrimination for those who want to earn their diploma. Also, because there are no traditional classrooms, non-traditional students never have to worry about being the “oldest” in their class or fitting into a social scene or clique. Just like with any student, you are free to study without judgment.

Earning your high school diploma online may not be right for everyone, but knowing the facts before deciding whether or not it is right for you is a key step. Knowing yourself, your goals and your learning style are all important factors that should play a role in your decision whether or not to enter into online education. Explore your options online: investigate the many choices available to you. Then you’ll be confident of making the choice that’s best for you.

About the Author

Allison Brenner

Allison Brenner

Allison Brenner is a copywriter for both James Madison High School and Ashworth College. Alli holds a B.S. in Journalism from the Georgia Southern University College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.